How Manchester United Hired

Jim Uncategorized Leave a Comment

As I have started to hire and train tutors, whom to hire has become the question to tackle.

I’ve been reading former Manchester United Manager Alex Ferguson’s “Leading,” lately, searching for tidbits that can – yes, this is corny – help my leadership of students!

Halfway through, Ferguson spells out how he hires coaches.  To drill his insights into my brain (making myelin, students!), I reviewed his criteria here:

“When I interview someone,

1.  I want to know how ambitious they are or whether they are just thinking about the job as a stepping-stone to something else.

2.  Apart from their qualities and qualifications, I want to measure the level of their commitment.

3.  I always look for enthusiasm, for a positive attitude, for eye contact and for personal courage.

[Ferguson says of assistant coach Carlos Queiroz, whom he employed for years:

‘He was dressed as if he was going to get married and I could see by the way he sat that he wanted the job.  He looked at me intensely – I always watch to see whether people can maintain eye contact because it is a good measure of their confidence.’]

4.  As United became more successful, I could see that some job candidates were quite nervous when they came to see me.  So I tried to put them at their ease by offering them a cup of tea.

I just wanted them to relax enough so that I could get the measure of who they really were.

5.  You can pick up the signs of someone’s character…and it’s often the little things that make a difference.  For example, someone who sits up properly and is leaning forward a little is showing that they are eager to start.

That is way better than appearing cocky or over-confident.

6.  Some people are often afraid to ask questions during interviews.  That’s daft.  Interviews should not be a one-way street.  You need to know what your employer can offer you.

I often get a measure of someone by listening to the questions they pose.  It shows how they think; offers a sense of their level of experience and degree of maturity.

7.  When you meet new people and try to assess the most vital component – their character – you are only making an educated guess.  Sometimes you are right and sometimes you are wrong.  The only real test of character comes with the passing of the years and watching them perform – particularly when they are going through a bad spell or recovering from a setback.

The ultimate judge of performance is Father Time.”

Is “Leading” a must-read book for managers and aspiring leaders?  No.

But for football (soccer) fans who are also aspiring leaders, then his insights and tales from managing Man. U are fantastic!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *